Advice

Wednesday 1 March 2017, 7:19am
Anonymous (not verified)

abseil with rope coils - Copy.JPG

Daniel Joll abseiling with coiled ropes to prevent the knotted ends from being stuck on a windy abseil

Creator: 
Karl Merry Schimanksi

Daniel Joll abseiling with coiled ropes to prevent the knotted ends from being stuck on a windy abseil

Creator: 
Karl Merry Schimanksi

We are propagating accidents, injuries and deaths. In almost all commercial industries, when multiple near misses or similar accidents occur, they are analysed and methods are instigated to eliminate the causal factors. Even rats in a maze learn not to make the same mistakes multiple times. But it seems the climbing community hasn’t yet learned. All too often I hear of people either dying, being seriously injured, or narrowly avoiding catastrophe due to the same preventable errors.

Friday 22 July 2016, 12:37am
daniel.joll

Kim mid height on the Super Couloir.JPG

Kim Ladiges climbing the Super Couloir Mt Blanc Du Tacul

Kim Ladiges climbing the Super Couloir Mt Blanc Du Tacul

Creator: 
Daniel Joll

Kim Ladiges climbing the Super Couloir Mt Blanc Du Tacul

Creator: 
Daniel Joll

There is no rope that does every job. Therefore when building your selection of climbing ropes here are a few points to consider.

As an alpine climber I keep quite 5 main ropes or pairs of ropes in my collection for regular use.

These ropes are made up of Tendon Master & Tendon Lowe ropes.

Saturday 2 January 2016, 11:42pm
Anonymous (not verified)

Jess in Squamish

Jess in Squamish

Cragging is just one part of training for alpinism

Creator: 
Pete Harris

Cragging is just one part of training for alpinism

Creator: 
Pete Harris

All of us find ourselves city bound from time to time. Here are some tips and tricks for staying mountain fit even during prolonged periods out of the mountains.

Wednesday 11 March 2015, 2:29pm
daniel.joll

IMG_0104.JPG

Steve Fortune short fixing, high up on the Nose of El Capitan

Creator: 
Daniel Joll

Steve Fortune short fixing, high up on the Nose of El Capitan

Creator: 
Daniel Joll

Please note that short-fixing is an advanced climbing technique and is not suitable for beginners or anyone new to trad climbing. In using this technique, it is necessary to have sufficient climbing experience to make a sound judgement call as to when it is appropriate to short-fix, and when it is not. This article seeks only to describe the concept of short-fixing and will not help you in making that judgement call. If you have any doubts, you should stick to regular belaying practises.

Wednesday 4 February 2015, 2:34pm
frazer.attrill

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Ben Dare on Professor Falls.

Creator: 
Jo-Anne

Ben Dare on Professor Falls.

Creator: 
Jo-Anne
1. Drop your heels - This is the most classic and common problem for people beginning ice climbing. Raising your heels too high can cause your front points to shear from the ice quickly and unexpectedly. Ideally heels should be so that your boots are completely horizontal, regardless of ice angle.
 
 
Wednesday 14 January 2015, 10:09am
Rose Pearson

Ice Climbing-0097.jpg

A selection of the kit that we used climbing each day - Ice axes (Petzl Quarks), crampons (Petzl Lynx), 40l pack, 1l thermos capacity, screamers, screws, abseil-tat, anchor set-up and sandwiches.

Creator: 
Jaz Morris

A selection of the kit that we used climbing each day - Ice axes (Petzl Quarks), crampons (Petzl Lynx), 40l pack, 1l thermos capacity, screamers, screws, abseil-tat, anchor set-up and sandwiches.

Creator: 
Jaz Morris

Ice climbing requires a surprising amount of equipment. First off there is all the gear to actually climb the ice, then there is the gear to protect the climb, and finally there is all the equipment you wear to stay warm in temperatures potentially below -20C. This article details the equipment we found to be most useful while ice climbing in Canada one January. We were generally climbing 3+ pitch routes, but we also spent some time both cragging and doing longer routes. Conditions varied from -25C (In Maligne Canyon) to 0C (On the Weeping Wall).

Wednesday 14 January 2015, 9:44am
jazmorris

What to wear for a day's winter climbing is a source for endless debate, and everyone will have different ideas about what constitutes the ideal system. What is undebatable is the end goal - being warm, dry, and actually able to climb, in a range of temperatures and conditions. That means that the basic clothes I wear never change, whether it's 0°C and sleeting in New Zealand or -30°C and dry in Canada.

Top:

- base layer

- hooded thin fleece

- thin merino hat

- one-piece thermal bib

Then add, as conditions require:

Tuesday 5 August 2014, 11:15pm
steven.fortune

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Steve Fortune and Daniel Joll high up on the West Rib of Denali, Alaska, during a successful climb to the summit.

Creator: 
Matthew Scholes

Steve Fortune and Daniel Joll high up on the West Rib of Denali, Alaska, during a successful climb to the summit.

Creator: 
Matthew Scholes

Alpine climbing is extremely physically demanding. Most other sports have a history and culture of systematic training. Yet in alpine climbing, despite these demands, and the potential benefits that training can bring, few do. Many climbers come from outside this culture of mainstream sports, so do not have the background in training to apply themselves, and there are no coaches out there to guide you. There is good knowledge out there on training for endurance sports and for rock climbing, but not covering the wide spectrum of demands involved in doing long, hard routes in the mountains.

Sunday 20 July 2014, 4:05am
daniel.joll

Rapping Off.jpg

Ben Dare abseiling off the south face of Barrier Peak in the Darran Mountains after an aborted first ascent attempt

Creator: 
Daniel Joll

Ben Dare abseiling off the south face of Barrier Peak in the Darran Mountains after an aborted first ascent attempt

Creator: 
Daniel Joll

It surprises me how few mountain climbers understand or know a safe and simple method to abseil down a climb leaving minimal gear. Usually if you plan to abseil down a climb either placing your own abseil points or by using old ones already in place you will need a few basic things.

In addition to your standard rack of climbing gear pack some extra 6mm cord. (usually around 10m), a knife, two screamers (expanding quick draws), short prussic, belay device, daisy/safety chain, and your ropes.

Sunday 19 January 2014, 7:59am
daniel.joll

Macpac inside bivvy.jpg

Daniel Joll preparing some insulation from the snow in a rock bivvy under the East Face of Torre Egger, Patagonia.

Creator: 
Steve Fortune

Daniel Joll preparing some insulation from the snow in a rock bivvy under the East Face of Torre Egger, Patagonia.

Creator: 
Steve Fortune

In fine weather a unplanned or a planned bivvy generally involves little suffering. Fine weather can also be very forgiving when it comes to small mistakes in gear management. Bivvying can be broken into two categories. Planned and Unplanned. I will start with the planned type, as an unplanned bivvy is more about enduring with what you have rather than planning for something you know is coming.

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