Team

Pete Harris

Pete was selected as part of the New Zealand Alpine Team in 2013.  Pete grew up on a steady dose of tramping adventures around the Canterbury foothills and Arthur’s Pass. Eventually, this strong foundation of tramping morphed into long trans-alpine trips, and ultimately climbing, around the South Island. Since beginning study at Canterbury University in 2010, climbing has ensured that he retain his sanity through five years of university, with every ‘Study Break’ or holiday being put to good use somewhere deep inside a National Park. Ironically, Pete discovered the joys of rock climbing shortly after most of the nearby crags in Canterbury took a turn for the worse, post-earthquakes.  In time, with a bit more skill and prowess on rock, ice and mixed terrain, Pete's keen to turn his sights to the challenges of more ambitious new routes and exploratory climbing; both in New Zealand, and further afield.

Pete is now a 'mentor-in-training' having completed a period of mentoring from 2013 to 2016. During his period as a mentored climber Pete made several notable ascents including the first ascent of the West Ridge of Mt Percy Smith in NZ and ascents of Denali, Alaska, and Alpamayo, Peru.

Richard Measures

Richard is a NIWA scientist and motivated alpine climber based in Christchurch. Originally from the UK he has a strong background in trad, Scottish mixed and European alpine climbing. The appeal of more adventurous sparsely populated mountains drew Richard to New Zealand in 2010. His recent climbing achievements include a number of technical ice and mixed first ascents in the Darrans as well as first ascents of three 5000m peaks in Kyrgyzstan by technical routes as part of an expedition in August 2013. He enjoys hard technical climbing but his biggest satisfaction comes from moving really fast on sustained, slightly less technical ground.

Rose Pearson

Rose began climbing and tramping as a student at Canterbury University in Christchurch. A passion for traditional climbing, and transalpine tramping eventually lead her to the mountains. After graduating she began seeking out alpine rock routes throughout the Southern Alps. Since, her selection to the NZAT in 2013 she has broadened her focus and embraced mixed and ice climbing. She is currently based in the UK, which offers easy access to Scotland and the European Alps. Over the years, she has climbed extensively in New Zealand, Australia and more recently in the UK, the French Alps and the Canadian Rockies. She has a handful of first ascents on esoteric mixed lines in New Zealand and Scotland.

Rose is now a 'mentor-in-training' having completed a period of mentoring from 2013 to 2016. During her period as a mentored climber Rose made several notable ascents including being the driving force behind the first ascent of the West Ridge of Taulliraju during a team expedition to Peru.

Steven Fortune

Steven grew up having adventures in the rivers and hills of Fiordland from a young age, but didn't discover climbing until later in life with the Canterbury University Tramping Club. For 5 years, Steven lived in Edinburgh, Scotland, working as a Postdoc researcher in medical imaging. His new-found passion took him trad climbing in the hills, sea-cliffs and quarries of the UK, Scottish Winter Climbing, to the European Alps climbing alpine rock, valley ice, and big alpine north faces.

Steven has been on expeditions to Alaska, climbing the Moonflower on the North Buttress of Mt Hunter, the Cassin Ridge on Denali, Nepal, attempting 2 unclimbed faces in the Khumbu region, and 3 trips to Patagonia climbing numerous routes, and one to Peru as well as rockclimbing in Yosemite and the Bugaboos.

He has moved back to New Zealand, working as an imaging engineer in industrial automation. He has climbed numerous new routes, from committing rock routes on the Kaipo Wall, ice and mixed routes in the Darrans in Winter, to mixed cragging test-pieces in the Remarkables and on Ruapehu. Although not a very strong rock climber, he's working hard at getting better and loves nothing better than applying the skills of hard technical climbing on big mountain routes.

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