Advice

Friday 28 August 2020, 11:25pm
sooji.clarkson

Disassembled Petzl Nomic

Disassembled Petzl Nomic

Disassembled Petzl Nomic

Creator: 
sooji.clarkson

Disassembled Petzl Nomic

Creator: 
sooji.clarkson

An issue well known to Petzl Nomics (and some other models of ice axe) is the tendency for the heads to loosen and develop movement over time. This is mostly due to the design – the head of the axe is held in by a single rivet. Over time the press fit between the head and the shaft gets looser. As there is only a single rivet the head can rotate around this and the overall effect is a wobbly or moving head.

Thursday 30 July 2020, 5:32pm
alastair.mcdowell

DSC04457 small.jpg

Enjoying a meal at the Niponino base camp, Torre valley

Creator: 
D. Joll

Enjoying a meal at the Niponino base camp, Torre valley

Creator: 
D. Joll

Nutrition on a mountaineering expedition can make or break the trip. Without the correct type of fuel, you cannot perform your best. In the context of mountaineering, there are 5 main constraints to be consider: weight, convenience, nutrition, shelf-life and taste.

Saturday 21 September 2019, 4:04am
alastair.mcdowell

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Running shorts and running shorts on a mountain summit?

Creator: 
A. McDowell

Running shorts and running shorts on a mountain summit?

Creator: 
A. McDowell

Imagine yourself jogging up the Matukituki Valley with a 3kg pack, cresting Bevan Col, donning light crampons on your running shoes across the Bonar Glacier, taking a late morning snack at Colin Todd, scrambling the Northwest ridge of Aspiring, and ripping it all the way back to the car in time for dinner in Wanaka. Welcome to the exciting world of Trailpinism: combining trail running gear, tactics and efficiency with mountain craft for a new way of tackling higher peaks.

Tuesday 7 May 2019, 4:38am
daniel.joll

Steve simul climbing on the West Face of Cerro Torre.JPG

Steve Fortune finishing a simul climbing block on the West Face of Cerro Torre

Creator: 
Daniel Joll

Steve Fortune finishing a simul climbing block on the West Face of Cerro Torre

Creator: 
Daniel Joll

This is a technique that when used right will speed up many alpine and multi pitch ascents.  Why speed up your ascent? Personally I think speed is a key factor to moving safely in the mountains.  If you climb slowly you are more likely to have unplanned bivvies, get stuck in storms or get caught out by rock fall or serac fall. Moving quickly over technical terrain is also good fun!

Starting with the basics: "simul climbing" is when two climbers move at the same time with a rope between them, placing and removing protection as they go.

Saturday 20 April 2019, 6:08am
daniel.joll

Kim climbing thin ice Croz Spur.jpg

Kim Ladiges climbing thin ice on the Croz Spur

Creator: 
Dan Joll

Kim Ladiges climbing thin ice on the Croz Spur

Creator: 
Dan Joll

A couple of years ago, I sold my business in NZ and more or less became a full time climbing bum. This coincided with becoming a father, and the two combined led me to examine some of my climbing choices and the statistical risks associated with them. I was keen to make sure that I had good habits in place to avoid those once in a lifetime accidents that over a long climbing career might happen.

Saturday 20 October 2018, 9:15pm
daniel.joll

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Gemma Wilson being helicopter rescued from the Dolomites via a long line

Creator: 
Kristy Shelley

Gemma Wilson being helicopter rescued from the Dolomites via a long line

Creator: 
Kristy Shelley

During a recent trip to the Dolomites in Italy I found myself in a rescue situation with an injured climbing partner. We were climbing as a team of three, and one of the seconders pulled off a large block which fell down onto the third member of our team. I thought sharing a few tips on how to manage the situation and how to haul an injured climber could be useful for someone else who might find themselves in a similar situation.

Saturday 21 April 2018, 3:24am
daniel.joll

Jono Approch to Les Drus.jpg

Les Drus North Face

Les Drus North Face

Creator: 
Daniel Joll

Les Drus North Face

Creator: 
Daniel Joll

This is a straight forward article with all the facts you need for climbing the Lesueur route on the North Face of Les Drus.  To follow this beta you will need two climbers who feel comfortable simul climbing up to M5.  Otherwise pitch it out and adjust your time expectation.   

Rack

Nuts 1 – 7

Cams Double set green C3 – 3.  Single #4 camalot and purple c3

Draws x 10

120cm slings x 2

2 x 4m cordalette

3 x tibloc's

2 x knife blades , 3 x ice screws, knife , v thread tool.  None of these needed on route, just for the descent. 

Tuesday 5 December 2017, 12:01pm
Anonymous (not verified)

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The ice hammock in use on an ascent of the North Face of Cholatse, Nepal

Creator: 
Matthew Scholes

The ice hammock in use on an ascent of the North Face of Cholatse, Nepal

Creator: 
Matthew Scholes

The ice hammock is a relatively new invention and although it's a great idea and works well, it's unlikely that any outdoor company is going to start making them commercially anytime soon, so we thought its worth writing an article for anyone who has an interest in making and using them for alpine climbing.

Tuesday 18 April 2017, 11:55am
steven.fortune

jonas.jpg

Jonas leading on the North Buttress of Sabre

Creator: 
J. Morris

Jonas leading on the North Buttress of Sabre

Creator: 
J. Morris

Within our team, we want to standardise the calls we use, so you always know what to expect when you climb with someone from the NZAT. It is good to reduce the calls you use to a bare minimum and not say unnecessary things as these can add more confusion than clarity. A belayer/climber does not need a running commentary and you don't want a shouting match at the end of a pitch. It is also a good principle to acknowledge any calls heard, as often the caller does not know if they are heard. This is normally a simple 'OK' or 'Thank You'. This article describes the standard climbing calls and procedures used when climbing. Sticking to these and only these, will help reduce misunderstandings when climbing.

Wednesday 1 March 2017, 7:19am
Anonymous (not verified)

abseil with rope coils - Copy.JPG

Daniel Joll abseiling with coiled ropes to prevent the knotted ends from being stuck on a windy abseil

Creator: 
Karl Merry Schimanksi

Daniel Joll abseiling with coiled ropes to prevent the knotted ends from being stuck on a windy abseil

Creator: 
Karl Merry Schimanksi

We are propagating accidents, injuries and deaths. In almost all commercial industries, when multiple near misses or similar accidents occur, they are analysed and methods are instigated to eliminate the causal factors. Even rats in a maze learn not to make the same mistakes multiple times. But it seems the climbing community hasn’t yet learned. All too often I hear of people either dying, being seriously injured, or narrowly avoiding catastrophe due to the same preventable errors.

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